FIFA World Cup 1950 Brazil

FIFA World Cup 1950 Brazil

Even though the lace-less construction had been invented at the beginning of the thirties, it took more than a decade for lace-less balls appearing at the FIFA World Cup. The 1950 Superball consisted of 12 identical panels but the edges of these panels were more curved than before. The Superball was a brown hand sewn ball, and FIFA allowed the manufacturer to print logos and text on the ball. As we can see in the case of the balls from 1954 (Switzerland), 1958 (Sweden) and 1966 (England) World Cup balls, this was an exception since these balls had to be free from branding — regardless of that the manufacturers put branded balls on the general market for sale at the same time. However, for the 1962 ball (Chile, between the 1958 and 1966 World Cups) they allowed print and text on the Crack ball used in the Chile World Cup.

Content courtesy of Worldcupballs.info

Posted by Marius J. Monsen in World Cup balls, World News
FIFA World Cup 1938 France

FIFA World Cup 1938 France

The Allen ball used in 1938 was similar to the Federale 102 from the previous World Cup since it also consisted of 13 panels. The cotton laces of the Allen balls were white — however, this was not a long lasting colour, since the rain and mud immediately changed the colour of the laces to brown. The ball was hand sewn, just like its predecessors, and had to be inflated by a skilled person. If the inflation and closure of the laces were not precise, the ball would not become spherical — which would influence the trajectory of the ball.

Content courtesy of Worldcupballs.info

Posted by Marius J. Monsen in World Cup balls, World News
FIFA World Cup 1934 Italy

FIFA World Cup 1934 Italy

The Federale 102 ball was composed by 13 polygonal panels which were cut and perfectly fitted together by hand sewing. Most of the classic balls at that time were 12 panel models (like the ones used 4 years earlier in the first World Cup) but the Federale 102 brought the innovation of having the laces on a separate panel to inflate the balls. The bladder was enclosed by lace with 6 rows. For the very first time the leather laces of a World Cup ball were replaced by brown cotton, very similar to the ones used on shoes. This represents a small detail but an important improvement — as cotton is much softer than leather, this encouraged players to head the ball more.

Content courtesy of Worldcupballs.info

Posted by Marius J. Monsen in World Cup balls, World News
FIFA World Cup 1930 Uruguay

FIFA World Cup 1930 Uruguay

The most famous pre-Adidas World Cup ball of all time is the T-model from the 1930 Uruguay World Cup. Uruguay played the majority of its matches with this ball until they faced Argentina in the final match. Since Argentina wanted to play with their own ball (which was a regular 12 panel ball), the final was played with the Argentinean ball for the first half of the match, and the second half was played with the Uruguayan ball. The footballs may have had a significant influence, as Argentina took a 2-1 lead in the first half with their own ball, but Uruguay replied in the second half with their T-model ball to win 4–2, making them the first World Champions and the T-Model legendary.

Content courtesy of Worldcupballs.info

Posted by Marius J. Monsen in World Cup balls, World News
Saint Petersburg Stadium

Saint Petersburg Stadium

Located in Saint Petersburg
Opened in 2017
67,000 capacity
Home of Zenit St. Petersburg

Saint Petersburg Stadium features a retractable roof and pitch and cost over $1.1 billion to build. It will host the third place match, a semi final, a round of 16 match, as well as Morocco v Iran, Russia v Egypt, Brazil v Costa Rica, and Nigeria v Argentina in the group stage.

Posted by Curt Baker in Arenas
Spartak Stadium

Spartak Stadium

Located in Moscow
Opened in 2014
45,360 capacity
Home of Spartak Moscow

Spartak Stadium features an adjustable facade that displays Spartak colors for club matches and Russian colors when the national team plays there. It will play host for Argentina v Iceland, Poland v Senegal, Belgium v Tunisia, and Serbia v Brazil in the group stage, as well as a Round of 16 match.

Posted by Curt Baker in Arenas
Rostov Arena

Rostov Arena

Located in Rostov-on-Don
Opened in 2018
45,000 capacity
Home of FC Rostov

Located on the Don River, Rostov Arena was built for the World Cup and will continue to be FC Rostov’s new home. It will be the venue for Brazil v Switzerland, Uruguay v Saudi Arabia, South Korea v Mexico, and Iceland v Croatia in the group stage, as well as a Round of 16 match.

Posted by Curt Baker in Arenas
Samara Arena

Samara Arena

Located in Samara
Opened in 2018
44,918 capacity
Home of FC Krylia Sovetov Samara

Samara Arena features many space-themed elements, a nod to the local region’s history in the aerospace industry. It will host Costa Rica v Serbia, Denmark v Australia, Uruguay v Russia, and Senegal v Colombia in the group stage, a round of 16 match, and a quarter final match.

Posted by Curt Baker in Arenas
Luzhniki Stadium

Luzhniki Stadium

Located in Moscow
Opened in 1956
81,000 capacity

Luizhniki Stadium has hosted the Summer Olympics, the Champions League Final, and now, the World Cup Final. Renovations made for this summer include removing the athletics track to move the stands closer to the pitch, preserving its historical facade, and adding additional seating. In addition to the Final, Luzhniki Stadium will host a semi final match, a round of 16 match, and Russia v Saudi Arabia, Germany v Mexico, Portugal v Morocco, and Denmark v France in the group stage.

Posted by Curt Baker in Arenas